Raphanus sativus L.
Family: Brassicaceae
(english: cultivated radish, garden radish, radish, wild radish)
[Raphanus raphanistrum var. sativus (L.) G. Beck]
Raphanus sativus image
Annuals or biennials, roots often fleshy in cultivated forms; often sparsely scabrous or hispid, sometimes glabrous. Stems often simple from base, (1-)4-13 dm. Basal leaves: petiole 1-30 cm; blade oblong, obovate, oblanceolate, or spatulate in outline, lyrate or pinnatisect, sometimes undivided, 2-60 cm × 10-200 mm, margins dentate, apex obtuse or acute; lobes 1-12 each side, oblong or ovate, to 10 cm × 50 mm. Cauline leaves (distal) subsessile; blade often undivided. Fruiting pedicels spreading to ascending, 5-40 mm. Flowers: sepals 5.5-10 × 1-2 mm, glabrous or sparsely pubescent; petals usually purple or pink, sometimes white (veins often darker), 15-25 × 3-8 mm, claw to 14 mm; filaments 5-12 mm; anthers 1.5-2 mm. Fruits usually fusiform or lanceolate, sometimes ovoid or cylindrical; valvular segment 1-3.5 mm; terminal segment (1-)3-15(-25) cm × (5-)7-13(-15) mm, smooth or, rarely, slightly constricted between seeds, not ribbed, beak narrowly to broadly conical to linear; style 10-40 mm. Seeds globose or ovoid, 2.5-4 mm diam. 2n = 18. Flowering May-Jul. Roadsides, disturbed areas, waste places, cultivated fields, gardens, orchards; 0-1000 m; introduced; B.C., Man., N.B., Nfld. and Labr., N.S., Ont., P.E.I., Que., Sask.; Ala., Alaska, Ariz., Ark., Calif., Colo., Conn., Del., D.C., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kans., Ky., La., Maine, Md., Mass., Mich., Minn., Miss., Mo., Mont., Nebr., Nev., N.H., N.J., N.Mex., N.Y., N.C., N.Dak., Ohio, Okla., Oreg., Pa., R.I., S.C., S.Dak., Tenn., Tex., Utah, Vt., Va., Wash., W.Va., Wis., Wyo.; Europe; Asia; introduced also in Mexico, Bermuda, South America, Africa, Atlantic Islands, Australia. Raphanus sativus is an important crop plant that is cultivated and/or weedy in most temperate regions worldwide. It is unknown as a wild plant, but suggested to be derived from R. raphanistrum subsp. landra, which is endemic to the Mediterranean region (L. J. Lewis-Jones et al. 1982).

Annual herb with a thick taproot 30 cm - 0.8 m tall Flowers: in branched clusters (raceme). Sepals four, upright, tips rounded. Petals four, pinkish purple to white, 1 - 1.5 cm long, bases narrowed. Fruit: a long, narrow pod, cylindrical, spongy, separated into two distinct parts (the lower part often missing). When dry it is prominently ribbed and not constricted between the seeds. Lower leaves: pinnately divided, oblong. Upper leaves: alternate.

Similar species: Raphanus raphanistrum is similar but has yellow flowers and a less thick taproot.

Flowering: late June to mid-October

Habitat and ecology: Introduced from Europe. A commonly cultivated garden vegetable that occasionally escapes into waste areas and disturbed places.

Occurence in the Chicago region: non-native

Etymology: Raphanus means "quickly appears." Sativus means cultivated.

Author: The Morton Arboretum

With more thickened taproot, pink-purple to white pet, and spongy fr not constricted between the seeds, the lower member usually obsolete, occasionally escapes from cult. but apparently does not long persist.

Gleason, Henry A. & Cronquist, Arthur J. 1991. Manual of vascular plants of northeastern United States and adjacent Canada. lxxv + 910 pp.

©The New York Botanical Garden. All rights reserved. Used by permission.
Raphanus sativus image
Liz Makings  
Raphanus sativus image
Morton Arboretum  
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image
Raphanus sativus image